Oracle Mobile Cloud Service (MCS) and Integration Cloud Service (ICS): How secure is your TLS connection? by Maarten Smeets

Posted: March 3, 2018 in Cloud, Mobile
Tags: , , , , , , ,

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In a previous blog I have explained which what cipher suites are, the role they play in establishing SSL connections and have provided some suggestions on how you can determine which cipher suite is a strong cipher suite. In this blog post I’ll apply this knowledge to look at incoming connections to Oracle Mobile Cloud Service and Integration Cloud Service. Outgoing connections are a different story altogether. These two cloud services do not allow you control of cipher suites to the extend as for example Oracle Java Cloud Service and you are thus forced to use the cipher suites Oracle has chosen for you.

Why should you be interested in TLS? Well, ‘normal’ application authentication uses tokens (like SAML, JWT, OAuth). Once an attacker obtains such a token (and no additional client authentication is in place), it is more or less free game for the attacker. An important mechanism which prevents the attacker from obtaining the token is TLS (Transport Layer Security). The strength of the provided security depends on the choice of cipher suite. The cipher suite is chosen by negotiation between client and server. The client provides options and the server chooses the one which has its preference.

Disclaimer: my knowledge is not at the level that I can personally exploit the liabilities in different cipher suites. I’ve used several posts I found online as references. I have used the OWASP TLS Cheat Sheet extensively which provides many references for further investigation should you wish.

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Cipher suites

The supported cipher suites for the Oracle Cloud Services appear to be (on first glance) host specific and not URL specific. The APIs and exposed services use the same cipher suites. Also the specific configuration of the service is irrelevant we are testing the connection, not the message. Using tools described here (for public URL’s https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/ is easiest) you can check if the SSL connection is secure. You can also check yourself with a command like: nmap –script ssl-enum-ciphers -p 443 hostname. Also there are various scripts available. See for some suggestions here. Read the complete article here.

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