Archive for the ‘WebLogic’ Category

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This session presents a practical introduction, with live coding, to Project Jigsaw and the Java Platform Module System in Java 9. The presentation involves constructing and hacking on a simple modular application to explore the essential aspects of the module system. You’ll see how the module system ensures reliable configuration and strong encapsulation, how it improves security, and how it makes the JDK itself configurable. Watch the video here.

 

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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Oracle Fusion Middleware environments often consist of multiple servers distributed across many physical hosts. To provision new environments we have the power of Rubicon Red MyST Studio to automate the creation and deployment of platforms both large and small, but there still remains a level of manual effort to validate that everything is working as expected. One of the most basic checks is to review the server logs for errors. Given the size and complexity of some environments this task can be time consuming, and it is likely for things to be missed, making it a perfect candidate for automated assistance.

In this blog we will look at how we can automate checking for errors from all of the WebLogic Server Log files using the WebLogic REST APIs. The blog contains the following sections:

· WebLogic 12.2.1. REST APIs

· WebLogic Log Inspector

· Using the REST APIs to interrogate log files

· Resources

WebLogic 12.2.1 REST APIs

WebLogic 12.2.1 introduced a range of REST APIs for configuring, monitoring, deploying, and administering the WebLogic Server. For example, you can: Read the complete article here.

 

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

 

Introduction
There is a pretty popular architecture pattern when ADF applications are built on top of shared libraries. So the main application is being deployed as an EAR and all subsystems are implemented within shared libraries that can be independently built and deployed to WebLogic as JARs in "hot" mode without downtime. The advantages of this approach seem to be obvious:

· It decomposes the application implementing the concepts of modularization and reuse

· CI/CD process might be much faster as only one library is going to be rebuilt/redeployed

· There is no downtime while redeploying a shared library

It looks so cool that people choose this architecture pattern for their new projects and they are pretty happy with the decision they made while implementing the application. They get even happier when they go live to production as they can easily fix most of the bugs and implement new requirements avoiding full redeployment and without any downtime.

Definitely, before getting to production any change (and therefore a corresponding shared library) should be deployed and tested at the previous environments such as QA, UAT, etc.

In a while nobody knows exactly what versions of shared libraries are deployed at each environment. It’s getting a bit tricky to support the application and implement new changes in this situation as even though it works on this environment there is no guarantee it’s going to work on the next one as the combination of shared libraries could be different. If it is a big application and there are many shared libraries, this might become a nightmare and pretty often people just give up getting back to full redeployment of everything and eventually to a monolith EAR. It’s not that cool, but at least they can sleep again now. Read the complete article here.

 

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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Oracle has been active with Docker for quite some time now. From the first hesitant steps from some enthusiastic employees with Docker build files that helped people to get going with Oracle software in their experimental containers to a GitHub repo with a broad set of extensive Docker build files to create Docker containers with various Oracle product that are supported (https://github.com/oracle/docker-images). And of course the Oracle Container Cloud – launched in the Spring of 2017 that will run custom Docker images. And now recently the next step: the availability of the Oracle Container Registry – Oracle’s own Docker container registry that offers a range of ready built container images with Oracle software. Using these images – all you need to run Oracle platform component on your local Docker Host or Kubernetes cluster is docker pull from this registry followed by a docker run.

In this article I will give a quick example of how to work this the Oracle Container Registry. It can be found at:  https://container-registry.oracle.com .

The steps to go through:

1. Register as a user for the Oracle Container Registry (one time only, an Oracle account is required)

2. Explore the registry, locate the desired image(s) and Agree to and accept the Oracle Standard Terms and Restrictions for the image(s) that you want to make use of

3. Do a docker login to connect to the Oracle Container Registry. Read the complete article here.

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

The Oracle Container Registry provides Oracle tested and approved Docker and other container images for Oracle products.You must accept licensing terms before using Docker or other tools to pull images into your local registry or environment. Visit the website here.

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Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

 

imageThis blog demonstrates Worker Applications on Oracle Cloud with the help of an example which makes of

1. Redis as a job queue (deployed on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Classic), and

2. a Java based service which acts as a asynchronous processor (a.k.a Worker) deployed to Oracle Application Container Cloud

Worker applications ?

Traditionally, any service deployed to Oracle Application Container Cloud was was required to bind to $PORT and was given a public URL. But this is actually not required for all kinds of workloads/app types — so you were forced to do things like expose a REST endpoint for a batch processing app ( I know I have 😉 )

Worker applications were built to tackle these kind of problems (and more) and they differ from traditional ACCS applications. Read the complete article here.

 

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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A fairly common combination of Oracle Public Cloud services that I use together – for example for the implementation of microservices – is DBaaS, Application Container Cloud, Application [Container] Cache and Event Hub. In this article, I show the sequence of steps I went through in the Oracle Public Cloud console a few days back to prepare a demo environment for my presentations at Devoxx Morocco in Casablanca. Alternatively, I could have used the command line psm tool and a few straightforward scripts to create the cloud environments. The set up I set out to create looks like this:Several Node applications will run on Application Container Cloud. Each will have service bindings to the same Application Container Cache (a black box powered by Oracle Coherence), a specific schema in a designated pluggable database in an Oracle Database instance and [a specific topic on]Event Hub (with Apache Kafka inside). The applications on Application Container Cloud need public ip adresses, as does the Topic on Event Hub. For my convenience in this demo, I also want to be able access the database directly from my laptop on a public IP address. Read the complete article here.

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn Forum Wiki

Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress