Posts Tagged ‘opn’

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I think offline functionality topic should become a trend in the future. Its great that Oracle already provides solution for offline – Oracle Offline Persistence toolkit. This is my second post related to offline support, read previous post – Oracle Offline Persistence Toolkit – Simple GET Response Example with JET. I have tested and explained with sample app how it works to handle simple GET response offline. While today I would like to go one step further and check how to filter offline data – shredding and querying offline.

Sample app is fetching a list of employees – Get Employees button. It shows online/offline status – see icon in top right corner. We are online and GET response was cached by persistence toolkit:

We can test offline behaviour easily – this can be done through Chrome Developer Tools – turn on Offline mode. Btw, take a look into Initiator field for GET request – it comes from Oracle Offline Persistence toolkit. As I mention it in my previous post – once persistence toolkit is enabled, all REST calls are going through toolkit, this is how it is able to cache response data: Read the complete article here.

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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This week I had some interesting Oracle JET discussions with a couple of developers at one of our customers. One of the things was regarding the inline use of CSS that I found in the Views of the Modules. I didn’t think that made sense so, after asking, I was told that this was because they did not find a way to use specific CSS per module. The question was if it was possible to use one specific CSS per Module in an Oracle JET Application. Besides that I thought it might also be useful to put everything that belongs to a module in its own folder. That could help developers to get a better understanding of the structure of the application. Besides that it is more like the structure of Oracle JET Composite Components where also everything that belongs to that component is under one folder.

Obviously this should be possible by explicitly loading a CSS in the view of the module. Geertjan already blogged about it : https://blogs.oracle.com/geertjan/referencing-css-from-an-oracle-jet-module. The same goes for restructuring the JET application into a more functional architecture: https://blogs.oracle.com/geertjan/restructuring-of-oracle-jet-applications

So nothing really new here, although it is a slightly different approach. Just writing up things here for my own reference. Feel free to use this if you like. In this post I will describe the implementation somewhat more detailed and have a working sample application available. For this blogpost I used the simple application that can be create on with the Oracle JET CLI. I will show you the steps to go from that to the "alternate" architecture. The goal is to have all files for one module in one specific folder. Read the complete article here.

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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Welcome to the 3rd article on our new Blog series about Oracle JET and Oracle Cloud.

Today we’ll start designing our application, starting with its Data Model. For that, well be focusing on Oracle’s SQL Developer Data Modeler as our tool and design the application’s underlying data model.

So, without further ado, let’s dig right in.

Data Modeling Workflow

Let’s start our SQL Developer and go right into the Data Modeler.

Open up the model browser and save the existing design with a proper, understandable name. I chose “OJetBlog-DataModel”.

Accessing the Data Modeler Browser

Save the design to give it a proper name

Once you have done this, you can start working on your Logical Model. As you know, there are several models to represent your data model, from the most high level (not bound by the RDBMS) to the Physical Model that is totally dependent on the RDBMS.

For our exercise, we’ll model our application in our Logical Model, pass it through to the Relational Model, and the Physical Model, through the generations of specific DDL for our Oracle Cloud Database. Any changes that we need to make in our database will be performed at the Logical level and then, using the SQL Developer tools, passed through our workflow and finalized in a DDL that will be executed on our DB. Keeping this workflow ensures coherence in your designs and a properly documented and maintained DB. Read the complete article here.

 

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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JET Composite Components – are useful not only to build UI widgets, but also to group and simplify JET code. In this post, I will show how to wrap JET table into composite component and use all essential features, such as properties, methods, events and slots.
Sample app code is available on GitHub. JET table is wrapped into composite component, it comes with slot for toolbar buttons:

What is the benefit to wrap such components as JET table into your own composite? To name a few:
1. Code encapsulation. Complex functionality, which requires multiple lines of HTML and JS code resides in the composite component
2. Maintenance and migration. It is easier to fix JET specific changes in single place
3. Faster development. There is less steps to repeat and less code to write for developer, when using shorter definition of the wrapper composite component
Sample application implements table-redsam component, for the table UI you can see above. Here is component usage example, very short and clean: Read the complete article. here

 

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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The essential message of this article is the automation for Oracle JET application of the flow from source code commit to a running application on Oracle Application Container Cloud, as shown in this picture:

I will describe the inside of the “black box” (actually light blue in this picture) where the build, package and deploy are done for an Oracle JET application.

The outline of the approach: a Docker Container is started in response to the code commit. This container contains all tooling that is required to perform the necessary actions including the scripts to actually run those actions. When the application has been deployed (or the resulting package is stored in an artifact repository) the container can be stopped. This approach is very clean – intermediate products that are created during the build process simply vanish along wih the container. A fresh container is started for the next iteration.

Note: the end to end build and deploy flow takes about 2 to 3 minutes on my environment. That obviously would be horrible for a simple developer round trip, but is actually quite acceptable for this type of ‘formal’ release to the shared cloud environment. This approach and this article are heavily inspired by this article (Deploy your apps to Oracle Cloud using PaaS Service Manager CLI on Docker) on Medium by Abhishek Gupta (who writes many very valuable articles, primarily around microservices and Oracle PaaS services such as Application Container Cloud).

Note: this article focuses on final deployment of the JET application to Application Container Cloud. It would however be quite simple to modify (in fact to simplify)the build container to not deploy the final ZIP file to Application Container Cloud, but instead push the file to an artifact repository or deploy to some other type of runtime platform. It would not be very hard to take the ZIP file and create a fresh Docker Container with that file that can be deployed on Kubernetes Cluster or any Docker runtime such as Oracle Container Cloud. Read the complete article here.

 

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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Loyco is using Oracle JET to build and run their financial reporting application. This application improves user experience and allows easy navigation through financial data reports. Without extra roundtrips to the REST back-end service, drilldowns related to Cash, Subledger, Payments and Journal modules are displayed using such JET components as tables, lists and charts. All this allows seamless and fast data browsing on the client side. The application is relying on a dynamic UI, which provides filter and sort options for data based on such criteria as financial year, month, etc. There are no static filters defined, the UI is driven by dynamic master-detail data coming from the back-end. The Oracle JET based Loyco Finance application was built by the Red Samurai Consulting team. Read the complete article here.

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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We are building our own enterprise chatbot. This chatbot helps enterprise users to run various tasks – invoice processing, inventory review, insurance cases review, order process – it will be compatible with various customer applications. Chatbot is based on TensorFlow Machine learning for user input processing. Machine learning helps to identify user intent, our custom algorithm helps to set conversation context and return response. Context gives control over  sequence of conversations under one topic, allowing chatbot to keep meaningful discussion based on user questions/answers. UI part is implemented in two different versions – JET and ADF, to support integration with ADF and JET applications.

Below is the trace of conversations with chatbot:

User statement Ok, I would like to submit payment now sets context transaction. If word payment is entered in the context of transaction, payment processing response is returned. Otherwise if there is no context, word payment doesn’t return any response. Greeting statement – resets context.

Intents are defined in JSON structure. List of intents is defined with patterns and tags. When user types text, TensorFlow Machine learning helps to identify pattern and it returns probabilities for matching tags. Tag with highest probability is selected, or if context was set – tag from context. Response for intent is returned randomly, based on provided list. Intent could be associated with context, this helps to group multiple related intents: Read the complete article here.

 

Developer Partner Community

For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Technorati Tags: PaaS,Cloud,Middleware Update,WebLogic, WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress